From Garden to Table: Getting to Know The Tastier & Healthier Leafy Greens

Leafy greens not only add color to your plate, but they add bountiful nutrition and potential health benefits. Green vegetables are among the types most likely lacking in the everyday diet. Eating a diet rich in leafy greens packed with nutrients come with numerous health benefits & also reduces the risk of many ailments like blood pressure, diabetes and even heart stroke. Read em, eat em, & reap the benefits.

Dark green leafy vegetables provide a variety of nutrients and fiber. They are rich in Vitamin A (from the carotenoid natural pigments), C, K and the B vitamin folate. Leafy greens also contain calcium and iron. They also provide a variety of phytochemicals (plant chemicals) that have potential health benefits. Phytochemicals initially provide protection for the plants. When we eat vegetables, many of these natural chemicals may help protect us from chronic diseases, including cancer and heart disease.

While we think about carrots as eye-protecting agents, dark leafy greens exceed their abilities. Dark leafy greens also provide the natural pigments lutein and zeaxanthin, which have been shown to reduce our risk for macular degeneration, a leading cause of blindness. Naturally low in calories leafy greens are low in calories. Lettuce has about 10 calories per cup.

Let’s see some the highly nutrient-rich leafy greens that not only tasty but super healthy too.

Nutrient-Rich Leafy Greens

Spinach:

Raw spinach is high in vitamin A (beta-carotene) and a good source of vitamin C and folate. Cooked spinach is high in vitamin A (beta-carotene) and folate and is a good source of vitamin C, riboflavin, vitamin B6, calcium, iron, and magnesium. Although spinach is a good source of iron and calcium, oxalic acid (a chemical that is present in the leaves) inhibits the body’s absorption of these nutrients. Absorption of iron can be increased by eating spinach with a fruit or vegetable that contains vitamin C.

Cabbage:

Cabbage is high in vitamin C. As a cruciferous vegetable, it contains significant amounts of nitrogen compounds called indoles, which are phytochemicals that may help prevent some types of cancer.

Chicory:

Chicory is high in folate, vitamin A, vitamin C, potassium, and fiber. It is also a good source of calcium, magnesium, riboflavin, and vitamin B6.

Napa Cabbage:

Raw bok choy is high in vitamin A and vitamin C. One serving of cooked napa cabbage is a good source of zinc.

Collards:

One-half cup of cooked collards is a good source of fiber and calcium and is high in vitamin A (beta-carotene), vitamin C, and folate. As a cruciferous vegetable, collards contain phytochemicals that may help prevent cancer.

Watercress:

Watercress is high in vitamin A and vitamin C. As a cruciferous vegetable, it contains phytochemicals that may help prevent cancer.

Lettuce:

Romaine and loose leaf lettuce contain five to six times the vitamin C and five to ten times the vitamin A of iceberg. Romaine and butterhead lettuce are good sources of folate.

What is an easy way to eat all these nutrient-dense leafy greens?

Wellbeing nutrition makes it easy for you! With their advanced research, they created a powerful combination of all leafy greens that are rich in vitamins, minerals. Harvested in the healthiest environment these leafy greens are combined using a science-driven processes just to form an effervescent tablet, without losing its benefits. Not to forget these are a healthy way to stay hydrated also these healthy tabs are easy to buy, carry and consume.

Wellbeing Nutrition

The Bottom Line

Leafy greens are brimming with vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, and other essential nutrients. They are full of chlorophyll, they are alkalizing, and they aid natural detoxification. They’ve also been shown to contribute to a decreased risk of many health issues, such as diabetes, obesity, and even cancer. Starting today, add a variety of leafy greens to your diet or just take a bubbly pill of Wellbeing Nutrition.

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